Speaking up for Palestine as Christians

I don’t usually write about political current affairs or religion, the former because I don’t feel that informed or strongly about issues to write about them, the latter because I think it’s a personal belief issue (and declaring one’s religious beliefs tend to make people judge with hostility unnecessarily). But the more I read about certain issues, the less able I am to just stay silent, when there are such blatant injustices involved. I thought quite hard about the title, thought of more pompous sounding ones like Freedom and Oppression, or Oppression in the Holy Land, etc. But it seems easier and less pretentious to just cut to the chase.

Today (2 Nov) marks the centenary of the Balfour Declaration¹, made by the British government in 1917 during World War I in support of the establishment of “a national home for the Jewish people” in Palestine. In the declaration, the British also added the caveat that “nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine”. Looking at what’s happened to Palestine since then however, and how Palestinians have been/are treated, it’s fair to say that all notions of respecting the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities have gone out of the window, if they even ever existed. [And in some cases, even Jews suffer discrimination, if they’re not Ashkenazi who are from European countries].  The Balfour Declaration is problematic in many ways, and the oppression of Palestians by Israelis in their homeland is outrageous, but my problem with this whole issue is the seeming lack of awareness of this issue among Christians, and worse, justifications for the Israelis by Christian Zionists.

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Adverts for the #MakeItRight campaign banned by Transport for London

As a Christian, to be unaware of what’s going on in the land from which our religion originates is a failure of education. Growing up Catholic, I’ve attended Sunday masses every week for almost the entirety of my 25 years. And every week, without fail, there would be some mention of the land of Israel. So I live my life thinking Israel is the land of milk and honey, that some pretty horrific things went on there in the past, but it’s all history now. And that the Israelis have always lived in Israel. It’s only been in the last year or so, that I became more aware of the realities of life in what’s now commonly accepted as Israel. Of course, it didn’t help that Israel and Singapore have always had good relations, and it’s a well-known fact that our Armed Forces were trained by the Israelis back in our early days of Independence. I never thought too much of Israel beyond that, not knowing anything about the Israeli occupation. On hindsight, it was just foolish of me to assume that Singapore would not establish good relations with Israel just because they were committing morally reprehensible acts. Singapore is after all, just a small vulnerable country that strives for good diplomatic relations with all countries (especially powerful ones).

Being now more aware of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, coming across Christian Zionists (Christians who believe that Jews returning to the Holy Land and establishing the state of Israel is in accordance with the fulfillment of bible prophecy) who justify what the Israelis are doing is an affront to my religious senses. What the Israelis are doing (restricting movement of people, of vital goods and services, grabbing land from the natives, assaulting even children etc. – go forth and Google and be horrified) is an affront to anyone’s sensibilities, whether religious or not. To use religious justification (which in my opinion is a weak argument because it’s usually more about gaining power than anything that is morally right) just insults everyone who is religious. If one needs a bible (or torah) phrase to justify taking land away from people who’ve always lived there, then how about “You shall not oppress or afflict a resident alien, for you were once aliens residing in the land of Egypt.” (Exodus 22:20)

What was done 100 years ago, is done. The damage caused in Palestine echos those from other colonised countries, but on a much worse scale. I don’t claim to have a solution to the problem, or to know much about the back story behind what’s been done, but condoning Israel’s actions (and supporting companies that are complicit in the occupation) is unacceptable. Palestinians are calling for recognition of their rights, their right to live on their land as their forefathers have lived for centuries, their right to move around freely on their land, their right to be human, something that all of us, any of us should be able to identify with and support. And the UK, as the main perpetrators, should apologise.


1 Palestinians are calling for the British government to apologise for the Balfour Declaration, and are marking the centenary with a campaign around the UK to #MakeItRight. On Twitter though, the hashtag has been interestingly hijacked.

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